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24 December 2015

Update on WAYWARD

WAYWARD's first day under open sky
 

Update on WAYWARD

I've got to apologize for the abrupt break in this narrative. And just as things were getting exciting!

Our primary internet access went down, and we've only now cobbled together a work-around. Alas, it's still far from optimal for a number of reasons. Further posts will remain catch-as-catch-can.

So, an update for now, and I'll back-fill to catch up as I'm able.

WAYWARD has been made weather-tight (decks sheathed, hatches, paint and windows). The copper bottom plate is complete, with only the chine angle to go (more about a SNAFU re the angles, later).

In October, we were obligated to switch over from Tyee to Warmsprings Bay (about 12nm distant) for winter caretaking at the latter. Complicating the matter was a hydro power washout that leaves us with intermittent electrical and much compensatory wood-processing over the winter.

After much waffling, we decided not to launch and bring WAYWARD with us. Since she's yet unrigged, wed need a tow both directions, imposing on others for the favor. Given our duties, there's very little chance of working on the boat over the winter. Finally, WSB is a wet hole compared to Tyee, and mold and mildew of much greater concern.

So it's a seven month break from building, for us. We brought sailmaking tools and material, and hope to complete them by our return in May.

Meanwhile, we hear from Tyee that WAYWARD's decks appear to be looking fine after a very wet few months in the open. This is good early news for the experimental sheathing – acrylic cloth set in TiteBond III. It was inexpensive, easy on our health, easy to apply, even under marginal conditions (persistently high humidity) and water clean up. But more on that, later.

Happy Holidays to one and all!


15 comments:

  1. I was wondering how it was going. So glad you posted! Looking good!

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  2. Glad to read the update and see your newest project looking like a proper boat. Wow -- even without the sails, what an example of a thing being greater than the sum of its parts!

    I know you've used a lot of self-deprecating humor in the past regarding the appearance of triloboats. Some deflective, some true, always funny. However, I must say that Wayward is actually a nice-looking boat! Lines, proportions, colors ... you name it. Instead of the ubiquitous, fashion-model curves that turn so many heads, your new boat has a different form of good looks, something on the border between rugged and sophisticated. Like the best of save-you-when-the-chips-are-down action heroes.

    That said, I hate to be the first to tell you this, but I think your boat is a tranny. Fortunate and fitting that you chose a gender-ambiguous name ;-)

    Really looking forward to seeing it under sail with you two smiling from the deck!

    P.S. - So, I'm curious -- what color for the sails this time around?

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    1. Hi Yoda,

      I hafta admit... I go for these kind of looks and rougher, yet.

      Sails are going to be... um... TOAST. Not our first choice (China Red), but sort of a parchmenty second. Sigh. Like the song goes, "Ya can't always get whatcha wa-ant, but if ya try sometimes - ya just might find - ya get whatcha ne-eed!"

      Dave Z

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    2. Yeah, never heard of "toast" as a color for anything. Not really awe-inspiring, and sort of lacks the visual and acoustic pizzazz of China Red. That said, I think a beige-family sail would look nice on that boat, and work well to tie the existing colors together. Especially if more natural wood, like the existing handrails, appeared on the exterior someday. Anyone for black locust window framing? ;-)

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  3. Good to get news and an update. Delays can happen anytime. I am delayed also, mainly health issues, not mine, but still a worrying time. Joel in Suffolk, UK (for some reason I come up under Welcome to my website)

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  5. they live and breathe....great to see updates with promises of more.....be well...blessings tou you both. scott

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  6. cannot wait to hear more on the acrylic/titebond experiment!

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  7. Thanks for the update!! We were all waiting!!! It is beautiful! The narrow hull looks like a locomotive. I love it. Cheers!!

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  8. looking forward to seeing more details. What are the black devices at the forward & rear sides of the hull? Also, how are your main windows installed? I just finished the bottom sandwich of wood and insulation, and the 4 bulkheads are attached and temporarily braced on my 32x8

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    1. Hi Dennis,

      Those are temporary vent covers (now flaps cut from raingear). They ventilate the fore and aft holds.

      Your build is looking GREAT at dennisdonohue.blogspot.com! I'm working to get it linked here and at the Tboat blog.

      Dave Z

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  9. I like Wayward, in what you might call the bad way, Do it my way, not the conventional way.

    Nothing conventional about a square sailboat.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Charles,

      Good to be bad!

      Actually, square sailboats were once quite conventional. I've seen museum models and pics of them, ranging from China to Europe to the E Coast to Alaska to ALMA (and here whilom sisters) in SF Bay.

      Cheap and easy is a conventional niche!

      Dave Z

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  10. Hi guys! Great to see how far you have progressed without all the coffee breaks I/we incurred :)one more of our clan now. Talked to Bob the othe day , sounds like the lodge is coming along slowly. We miss you guys and the surrounding landscape. We will be in touch as we are leaning toward coming back (I know ha ha) in a little over a year for a more extended stay :)
    Take care Anke & Britts
    T,E,C,&C

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  11. Any more updates on the new boat?

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About Me

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Anke and I live aboard SLACKTIDE, our T26x7 ketch. We sail by wind, tide and muscle in the waters of mid- to northern Southeast Alaska. We try to maximize the joys of life, and minimize the chores. ........ We live between the communities of SE Alaska, but drop in to visit with friends. Lately, we've worked, every other winter, care-taking Baranof Wilderness Lodge in Warmsprings Bay. This has given us a window on Web. ........ We're working toward a subsistence lifestyle, somewhat impeded by addictions to coffee, chocolate and cheese. ........ We think TEOTWAWKI is looming, and while we won't be ready, we'd at least like comfortable seats.